Why canned foods can lead to inflammation and weight gain – Union Democrat

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Rain showers this evening with clearing overnight. Low 28F. Winds light and variable. Chance of rain 80%.
Updated: January 16, 2023 @ 7:50 pm
If you’re trying to eat healthier — especially if you’re watching your blood pressure — you might want to think twice before popping open a can. (Ozgur Coskun/Dreamstime/TNS)

If you’re trying to eat healthier — especially if you’re watching your blood pressure — you might want to think twice before popping open a can. (Ozgur Coskun/Dreamstime/TNS)
There’s nothing more convenient that heating up a bowl of canned soup. And when the weather is gloomy, there’s nothing more appealing than a warm bowl of soup. Even if you’re making your own soup, it’s likely you’ll open a can of some vegetable or an another.
But if you’re trying to eat healthier — especially if you’re watching your blood pressure — you might want to think twice before popping open a can.
While convenient, canned foods often contain very high amounts of sodium. A half cup of canned peas has 310 mg sodium, compared to just 7 mg in a half cup of frozen peas.
The extra sodium content in canned foods has been linked to weight gain, inflammation and high blood pressure.
Raw and frozen vegetables not only have less sodium, they generally contain vitamins, minerals and nutrients. But if canned vegetables are the most convenient option, there are still ways to make them a bit healthier.
“Draining and rinsing canned vegetables for a couple of minutes can reduce sodium content by 9-23%, depending on the vegetable,” according to Healthline.
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