Robert Pattinson on "insidious" ways he's tried to lose weight – Cosmopolitan UK

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He says that in Hollywood, there’s a “crazy” pressure on men to look a certain way
Robert Pattinson has had an honest conversation about how the film industry treats actors, saying that the “crazy” beauty standards he’s been held up against have, in the past, forced him to lose weight via “insidious” methods.
“It’s crazy,” he told the Evening Standard of how Hollywood pressures men to look a certain way, adding that it’s “very easy” to fall into unhealthy patterns because of that. “Even if you’re just watching your calorie intake, it’s extraordinarily addictive — and you don’t quite realise how insidious it is until it’s too late.”
Although he says he’s never struggled personally with his body image, the actor admitted that previously he had “tried every fad you can think of” when it came to altering his appearance for work. Now however, the Twilight star says he’s opting not to focus on dieting, and is instead trying out “consistency” when it comes to healthy living.
Robert’s comments echo that of other celebrities. Most recently, Florence Pugh. “Women in Hollywood, especially young women in Hollywood, are obviously putting themselves in all these ways in order to get whatever opportunity that they need to get because that’s just the way that it’s been,” she told Vogue earlier this month.
“I had a weird chapter at the beginning of my career, but that was because I wasn’t complying. I think that was confusing to people, especially in Hollywood,” Florence continued. “I think I definitely put my foot down in that aspect.”
The Don’t Worry Darling star also stressed that she will never lose weight to “look fantastic for a role.” Instead, she flips it, and asks herself: “How would this character have lived? What would she be eating?”
If you’re worried about your own or someone else’s health, you can contact Beat, the UK’s eating disorder charity, 365 days a year on 0808 801 0677 or beateatingdisorders.org.uk.

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